Friday, July 25, 2014

Timeless Patterns, Not a Passing Trend

   If you follow me on Pinterest you'll know that I'm a bit of a designophile.  Most of my pinning involves home interiors.  Even before Pinterest I had a huge album where I cut out and saved room interiors from magazines, sort of an old school vintage Pinterest, if you will.  I came across an article recently claiming that the chevron trend is dead.  Chevron or zig zag patterns have totally saturated design blogs lately and while I'll be glad to see trends evolving into something new, I couldn't help scoffing at this claim.  First of all, calling something as timeless as chevron a trend, is a bit ridiculous.  You can find this pattern in Byzantine mosaics for crying out loud!  Classic patterns have been repeated all through the 20th century (and before) until now, so design snobs everywhere need to stop insisting they've created a trend and can quash it whenever they deem it no longer relevant.  For your viewing pleasure, I've gathered some examples of timeless patterns from the 20s-60s.  My point being, that if you love something, wear it, put it in your home, and never be deterred because someone else insists "it's dead."
  Chevron
Joesphine Baker 1920s

1930s

1940s

1950s

1950s

1960s

Polka Dots
1920s

1930s

1940s

1950s

1950s (dots AND chevron)

1960s

Plaid/ Gingham/ Tartan
1920s

1930s

1940s

1950s

1950s

1960s

Houndstooth
Coco Chanel 1920s

1930s

1940s

1950s

1960s 

1972

Stripes
1920s

1930s

1930s (stripes and chevron)

1940s

1950s

1960s

1960s

What are your favorite patterns?






















Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Mod mini

  When people think about preserving historic buildings, there are a couple of structures that stand out as worthy of our attention.  Styles like Colonial, Gothic revival, Victorian, and even Art and Crafts always garner a lot of attention.  What about buildings in our more recent past?  Mid-Century architecture isn't deemed nearly as sexy.  There are not a whole lot of people clamoring to save 1940s service stations, even if they are perfect examples of Art Deco architecture.  What about post war neighborhoods?  There aren't many historic walking tours dedicated to appreciating tracks of ranch homes.  Nobody is chaining themselves to these buildings, even though many are slated for demolition.  I had planned to do an outfit post in front of a vacant storefront downtown, but before I could schedule it, it had burned to the ground.  No one seemed bothered.  It was after all, just another vacant building in a struggling economy.  It got me thinking, perhaps I should seek out some of these vacant mid-century buildings for photo shoots.  Would't it be glorious, if instead of building more stucco, Styrofoam filled monstrosities, we rehabbed some of these well built, brick mid-century businesses?  This is a series dedicated to all the forgotten postwar buildings.  I would like to bring them out of obscurity and into your consciousness.  
   The first is Cleaver Carpet Center, which opened in 1947, and no longer has regular business hours.  The broken window is the first sign that this building is in trouble.
Outfit details:
1960s "Suburban Corner" minidress: thrifted
1950s stretch corset belt: garage sale
1960s enamel rotary phone brooch: Ebay
Poetic License shoes: Modcloth
Older image from Flickr


Sunday, July 13, 2014

The Satellite

If you've driven in South Colorado Springs you are probably familiar with the Satellite Hotel.  It was built in 1969 by architect Paul Brown, in an eight point compass shape in order to capture a panoramic view of the Rocky Mountains and the Eastern Plains.  The structure is a great example of Googie style architecture, with a futuristic starburst that sits atop the building, space station shape, and a sign that evokes the World's Fair globe.  Today the building is part hotel, part condominium, and fortunately, a local landmark.
Outfit details:
1950s Judy Palmer dress: Etsy
1950s aqua filigree cateye glasses: Etsy
assorted Lucite and Bakelite bangles: Ebay & thrifted
1960s hotel matchbook

image from midcenturystyle.net



Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Petals and Pinafores, Winnie age 3

This year my darling daughter turned three years old.   She is clever, funny, and has a sunny, happy disposition.  Every morning she wakes up with a smile.  She puts on her prettiest dress, throws on her Hello Kitty backpack and announces it's time to go to school (she's too young for preschool...but at least she'll be ready next year.)  She loves to sing, twirl around in fluffy skirts, and read anything about cats or kittens.  She told me she is a super hero and her powers are being adorable and making rainbows.  We are so happy to have her in our lives.
Outfit details: 
1940s cotton undershirt and 1940s red and white pinafore: antique store

Want to see Winnie's vintage birthday dresses from her last two birthdays?




Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...